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Sukkot

beautiful table in a sukkah, framed by curtains

In our backyards, on our porches, and outside our synagogues, Jews mark the fall harvest by building sturdy—yet fragile—structures out of natural materials, symbolizing both human vulnerability and God’s protection. No harvest holiday is complete without its fertility symbols, and Sukkot—when we wave the lulav and etrog—is no exception. Welcome Jewish women from throughout the ages into your sukkah as ushpizot, honored guests. Enjoy the crisp autumn air as you decorate your sukkah, then spend time with friends and family, celebrating your blessings and committing to sharing your bounty with others.

Healing Through Uncertainty: Lessons From Sukkot

By Sue Gurland
Sukkot invites us to live more fully present lives. The celebration of Sukkot incorporates two paradoxical elements: the uncertainty and vulnerability of the Israelites living in booths in the...  more
Blog Post | October 2, 2015

Tags: sukkah

Altered Harvest: Sukkot and Climate Change

By Rav Kohenet Jill Hammer
The sukkah is one profound place to remember the effects of global scorching on all of us. Sukkot, also known as the Feast of Tabernacles, is the third and final harvest festival of the...  more
Blog Post | October 1, 2015

Wrapped in a Shelter of Peace

By Sarah Barasch-Hagans
When I imagine wearing my tallit in Ferguson and afterward, I am imagining how it will help carry with me a sense of security and home—a portable home just like the sukkah. ...  more
Blog Post | October 6, 2014

Tags: sukkah, tallit

You Shall Have Nothing But Joy

by Rabbi Roni Handler
We don’t want Yom Kippur to leave us in a slump, struggling to pick ourselves up.  Instead, we must embrace joy so that we may restore balance in the world, in our community, and within...  more
Blog Post | September 28, 2012

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